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Recreational marijuana is legal Thursday, here's what you need to know to use in Michigan

(WWMT/MGN Online)

On Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018, recreational use of marijuana becomes legal in Michigan for adults 21 and older. So what happens when a state resident chooses to smoke?

Among the answers are a number of restrictions recreational users need to remember.

“Ingestion has to be consumed out of public view, so I don’t think the average citizen is going to notice a difference,” said Lt. Matt Wolfe, the acting deputy police chief in Portage.

Still, as long as you’re 21 or older and in the privacy of your own home you can legally use marijuana recreationally.

“You can possess up to two and a half ounces of marijuana if you’re 21 years or older. You can have up to 12 plants in your residence and up to 10 ounces of marijuana processed from those plants,” Wolfe said.

Renters have an important first step though: Check with your property manager before lighting up. Several property management companies told Newschannel 3 that marijuana falls under their no smoking policies already in place.

When it comes to driving, Wolfe said public safety offices will have to be more vigilant with how they enforce the law.

“If you’re not under the influence at the time of the traffic stop, you can be in possession of up to two and a half ounces of marijuana and marijuana paraphernalia,” Wolfe said.

For now, though, you won’t be able to buy recreational marijuana.

David Barns with the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs said the ability to sell and purchase will have to wait.

“It's continuing discussions to ensure the implementation of safe, efficient and consumer-focused regulatory system over the coming months," Barns said. “All indications point to our ability to have adult-use license applications available before the statutory deadline of Dec. 6, 2019.”

So far, the places that do sell marijuana in Michigan can do so only for medical use.

“You can procure it from somebody," Wolfe said, "but they can’t receive any form of payment."

Follow Callie Rainey on Twitter and Facebook.

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