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Portage officer involved shooting press conference

Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013 |
Portage officer involved shooting press conference story image
PORTAGE, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - Portage Police held a press conference Tuesday afternoon after an officer-involved shooting at Crossroads Village in Portage.

It happened just around 1:00 p.m. Tuesday, near the intersection of Constitution Boulevard and Romence Road.

According to Portage Police, a call came in Tuesday after a reported stabbing.

The victim, an unidentified female, reported that the suspect had fled the scene.

Police say a plain-clothes officer made contact with the suspect near Crossroads Village, where an altercation took place, and the officer fired his weapon.

At this time the suspect has not been identified and there is no word on his condition.

There is also no word given regarding the stabbing victim.
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Last Update on October 02, 2014 07:32 GMT

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