Bolger, Schmidt evade charges for election scheme

KALAMAZOO, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) - A few days ago, a year-long grand jury of one cleared House Speaker Jase Bolger, of Marshall, and former State Representative Roy Schmidt of any criminal wrong doing in their keystone cops effort to rig an election last year with a fake Democratic opponent.

Tonight in Tom's Corner, Tom Van Howe says that while they may not be crooks, there's nothing suggesting either one can be trusted.


How it can be that an effort to trick, to fool, to defraud voters, is anything but criminal is astonishing to me.

You can go to jail for cheating an innkeeper, but its business as usual when you're caught trying to cheat voters by abusing our electoral process.

In case your memory is foggy, here's what happened.

Representative Roy Schmidt, a long-time Grand Rapids Democrat, decided he wanted instead to be a Republican.

So he huddled with House Speaker Jase Bolger and came up with a plan. Schmidt would wait until the last minute before the election, then take voters by surprise by filing as a Republican.

By pushing it to the brink it would leave his old party without sufficient time to field a viable candidate.

But Schmidt and Bolger didn't leave that to chance either; they recruited a kid--a friend of Schmidt's son; someone who didn't even live in the district; someone who has no political ambition--to file perjure himself as the Democratic challenger.

They offered him $1,000 to stay in the race.

But in the glare of media scrutiny, the young sacrificial lamb dropped like rock.

And because no money had actually changed hands--and only because of that--no law was violated.

"Intent," apparently, only applies to other crimes.

In an incredible collapse, Schmidt went on to lose in the August primary to write-in Democrat Winnie Brinks.

Kent County's Republican prosecutor William Forsythe said he could find no law that had been broken--but called the Bolger-Schmidt effort to rig an election a "travesty," and likened it to rigging a boxing match.

There are laws against that, by the way.

So now a grand jury said the pair broke no law; that neither of them is a criminal.

Schmidt is already musing that he'd like to get back into politics. He says a suggestion by a former aide that there ought to be a law to prevent what he did from happening again is a "bunch of crap."

Bolger has apologized; but says he'd do it again. Without, the next time, the focus on the phony candidate.

He compared what he and Schmidt did to a football coach running a trick play.

Bolger is in his third term in the house and can't run again. But the smart money says he'll make a run for the state senate.

Just two guys who tried to rig an election. Two guys who violated the public trust. Two guys who abused the electoral process. They don't get it.

Neither one deserves to hold elective office. One can only hope voters remember when the time comes to send them that very message.

In this corner...I'm Tom Van Howe.