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Doc Talk: Embarrassing smells

What our bodies do and why they do those things can sometimes leave us stumped, stunned and maybe even a little self-conscious, but doctors have pretty much heard and seen it all.

What our bodies do and why they do those things can sometimes leave us stumped, stunned and maybe even a little self-conscious, but doctors have pretty much heard and seen it all.

In this week's Doc Talk, the experts are giving Newschannel 3's Erica Mokay the answers to some of those embarrassing questions.

Questions; We all have them. Some are simple and straight forward and some might make us a little uncomfortable.

So, what are those questions patients may be too embarrassed to ask? Well, the language was cleaned up a bit and two doctors at Borgess discussed them.

Seen it, heard it and, if there's a question, they've answered it.

Borgess Trauma and General Surgeon Dr. Stephanie Markle said, “If there's a name for it, it's happened before. You’re not the first person. There is no pioneer in almost anything medical.”

Doctors at Borgess say they've probably smelled it all, too.

So, in the case of an unsavory scent regarding feminine odor, OBG/YN Dr. Jennifer Hollings says, speak up.

Hollings said, “If you’re getting up in the morning, you’re taking a shower and an hour later, you smell an odor that you don't expect, then that might be something to be worried about.

That brings us to question number two (about number two).

Markle said, “People ask me all the time if it is normal for things that come out to smell like something died.”

So, are those offensive aromas all right? Or is it your duty to do something about it.

Markle says, again, it all depends.

She said, “The one that is the most worrisome is usually the smell that's related to bleeding and again, the only think I can use to describe it. Once you've smelled it you'll never forget it, but a wet penny. Just think of wet iron, is basically what it smells like. It's not good.”

Talking about it is good and potentially critical to your health.

Hollings said, “A great majority of the time there is a simple answer and I think that once people are aware of that, they're more likely to ask those questions. The information you share with me about yourself is only for me to help you get to a better place.”

We talked about a lot of different topics that some may consider taboo. You can find the answers to those embarrassing questions on Erica Mokay’s Facebook page:

If you have a question you're too embarrassed to ask your doctor, you can email them to emokay@sbgtv.com or send them privately on Facebook and we'll ask them.

Follow Erica Mokay on Facebook and on Twitter.

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